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Budō

Motif Information
Motif budo 01.jpg
Rōmaji Budō
English Grapes
Kanji 葡萄
Kana ぶどう
Season Autumn
Seasonal Exceptions None
Auspicious Yes
Motif Type Fruit
Pronounciation
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Budō were imported to Japan from China in the Nara period, but were not put into cultivation until the late Heian period when a wild descendant of the imported Chinese varieties was discovered in Yamanashi and began to be actively breed for fruit production. These grapes were later crossbred with European varietals in the Edo period and used to make wine. In the pre-modern period, most imported cultivars of grapes were vulnerable to fungal growth and other diseases and could not survive in the humidity of Japan.

Seasonal Use, Exceptions & Pairings

Budō was an exotic foreign motif and received its seasonality from Chinese traditions. In China, budō was highly associated with autumn.[1]

Motif Connotations & Symbolism

Budō symbolizes numerous offspring through it's tightly clustered fruit.

Auspicious Nature

When paired with squirrels, budō is an auspicious motif. In Chinese, squirrels and grapes are read as a rebus containing homophones for pine (songshu) and peach (taozi), symbols of longevity.[2] In Japan the auspicious meaning was preserved as budō ni risu (葡萄に栗鼠, squirrels among grapes) which is homophonous with "to discipline oneself in the way of the warrior"(武道に律す).

Common Motif Pairings

Identification & Style Variations

Describe how the pattern can be identified. If applicable, explain how the pattern is conventionally simplified.

Motif Examples

Motif in Literature & Other Usage

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In Poetry

Article Notes

Relevant Threads / Discussions

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References

  1. Seaman, Joyce. Manju: Netsuke from the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum. Ashmolean Museum. Oxford, 2013. p. 260.
  2. Seaman, Joyce. Manju: Netsuke from the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum. Ashmolean Museum. Oxford, 2013. p. 260.

Image Credits

  • Bika Bika
  • Tahanala

Authors & Contributors

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