Noh costume vocabulary/info

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Noh costume vocabulary/info

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 7:11 pm

I picked up this book, Sculpture in Silk: Costumes from Japan's Noh Theater http://www.amazon.com/Sculpture-Silk-co ... 620&sr=1-1, because the cover was pretty, and it has some information about recreating Noh costumes, though most of it focuses on the process of getting the silk, and not on the measurements and stuff, which I was kind of hoping for.

Anyway, it did go into detail of the costume pieces themselves (and has pretty pictures of them in action, and on hangers), including sharing the vocabulary, so I thought I'd share the vocab section here. Unfortunately, they did not provide the kanji. Since it's related to kimono, I figured others might want to know about it.

Noh costumes can be divided into thee forms:
1. Osodemono - broad-sleeved outer mantles
2. kosodemono - kimono with single-width sleeves, small cuff openings, and overlapping labels
3. hakama - divided skirts/pants

Osodemono
noshi - loose mantle for men or women with double-width sleeves
kariginu - round-necked hunting cloak with double-width sleeves
happi - men's cloak with double-width sleeves and front and back panels joined by a strap at the hem
sobatsugi - abbreviated; sleeveless version of the happi
chouken - dancing cloak of gauze weave in unglossed silk with design woven in gold and colors. Front and back panels fall free.
maiginu - women's dancing cloak of gauze weave woven with unglossed silk and an overall design in gold. The front and back panels are joined partway down the side.
mizugoromo - plain color traveling cloak in either plain or open weave; worn by men and women
hitatare - suit of matching jacket and long trialing divided skirts. Lined and woven in bast fiber.
suou - identical in cut and fabric with the hitatare, but unlined

Kosodemono
karaori - brocade garment for women
atsuita - twill ground garment with either check or brocade pattern, for men
atsuita karaori - brocade garment often worn by warrior-courtiers
surihaku - under-garment of white satin weave with imprinted decorations in gold or silver foil
noshime - men's undergarment of lustrous woven silk
nuihaku - embroidered satin garment worn as an outer robe, often with stenciled gold-foil decorations
koshimaki - a nuihaku and surihaku worn together, the latter exposed above and the former folded down at the waist so the sleeves hang over the hips

Hakama
ouguchi - plain-colored divided skirts with large pleats in front and stiffened, gathered panels in the back
hangire - broad divided skirts with dynamic gold or silver designs
sashinuki - courtier's pleated pantaloons, gathered at the ankle and worn over ouguchi
chigobakama - children's divided skirts

Others
kazura obi - hair bands worn by women over the wig but under the mask at the forehead level
koshi obi - belt sashes

Robes with red, which are used for young people, are called "iro-iri" (with color) and those without red are "iro-nashi" and are for women of middle age and above. Unlike in kabuki, costumes are not identified exclusively with individual roles and can be used in numerous roles and plays.

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Re: Noh costume vocabulary/info

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 7:12 pm

OctoGirlie

I'm not familiar with Noh theater, so I apologize if my question is n00bish-

For the references to women, are they referring to women's roles (that is, portrayed by male actors) or female performers themselves?

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Re: Noh costume vocabulary/info

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 7:12 pm

James

OctoGirlie wrote:
For the references to women, are they referring to women's roles (that is, portrayed by male actors) or female performers themselves?


I would think women's roles, since the Noh theatre is traditionally all male (there are some female Noh troupes and actors, though, such as Uzawa Noh).

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