Kateigaho Magazine

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Kateigaho Magazine

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:51 pm

Cutekitti

Has anyone ever read this magazine? Its wonderful and its based in Japan but its in English which is nice. It talks about the culture of Japan, especially the traditional aspects. The one I just purchased talks about the geisha Komomo. It has pictures that follow her career thusfar and talks wbout her transition from Maiko to Geiko. Its beautiful. However the magazine is very expensive. You have to have it shipped so a one year subscribtion (6 issues) is about $50. Yikes. I think its worth it though.

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Re: Kateigaho Magazine

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:52 pm

Iyolin

I received about 8 copies just before leaving Japan, but didn't have time to look at them until I got back. I loved it! A subscription is now on my Christmas list.

Just to be clear, I think there's a Kateigaho magazine that's Japanese, and Kateigaho International, which is the English version (as one of the letters said some Japanese friend commented that "my grandma reads Kateigaho!" [implying it's not really a young person's magazine]). Suits me and my "jimi" sense of style just fine.  :P


I really liked the edition that has the info about the Kabuki costumes.  :lovelove
And the one about Komomo, the new geisha who was born and partly raised outside of Japan. She's so cute! Her face is so round, and she looks so young... (well, that and she is!).

The Magazine's Website...
http://int.kateigaho.com/

Price seems high, but I think it's about 800yen in Japan, which is about $8, so $32 for a year, plus shipping over ($18 total, about $5/magazine, which is a touch expensive). Consider a Cosmo, though, I think those are about $6, and they're monthlies, and the content just doesn't compare to Kateigaho.  Oh, and there's only 4 issues a year (one for each season).  It's such a classy magazine!

EDIT: LOL Next edition (winter 2006) has a special on Tohoku (a region in Japan) in the Winter. I wonder what they covered, seeing as I lived there for a while. No one goes to Tohoku! It's so overlooked. I hope this helps it's image with the Japanese and foreigners. It's beautiful all year round.

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Re: Kateigaho Magazine

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:53 pm

shigatsuhana

Image
You mean like this? ;)

Image

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Re: Kateigaho Magazine

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:54 pm

claw789

IE gives an insider's view of rarely seen Kyoto

Kyoto's esoteric world of intricate conventions and traditions can sometimes be intimidating, especially in the hanamachi, the world of the geisha. But the spring 2007 issue of Kateigaho International Edition (KIE) (on sale March 1) provides a glimpse through the eyes of insiders that makes more accessible the ancient capital's world of geiko, as geisha are called in Kyoto.

KIE explores often unknown nooks and crannies of Kyoto -- with a strong emphasis on the city's geisha districts of Ponto-cho, Miyagawa-cho and Gion -- and finds insightful clues into what has made Miyako tick over the past 1,200 or so years.

"We have taken representatives of Kyoto's geisha world and got them to give a 'Best Picks of Kyoto,' " KIE'S Editor-in-Chief Takeshi Kudo says.

KIE's "guides" are an exotic cross-section of the 21st century version of the city. They include a Canadian who gave up the hurly burly world of professional soccer to become a Kyoto connoisseur and multi-faceted entertainer together with his Japanese wife, who is herself a former tayu, historically the most artistically adept inhabitants of Japan's floating world.

Kudo points out that the spring 2007 issue contains a bonus pictorial guide on how to dance like a Miyagawa-cho geiko, with dozens of the outstanding photos Kateigaho is known for accompanying an explanation of the seasonal elements involved in the dance.

"By covering a story to this extent, we can show readers the correct manner and customs involved in Japanese dance, even if the meaning isn't always fully passed on," Kudo says. "It's a page for a little bit of added fun."

KIE's Sales Division Manager Takeharu Suzuki agrees, adding that "this is a special containing information even the average Japanese wouldn't know of."

Also providing a slice of Kyoto life are the remarkable four generations of geiko from the Hatsunoya, a Ponto-cho geisha house whose founder has provided a direct line of performers that now includes her great-granddaughter.

Kyoto's traditions would be nothing without the long lines of artisans who have provided the talents that have kept the conventions alive, even when it would seem other choices would mean less strain.

Learn from KIE about the fascinating stories involved in the decade-long creation process of the exquisite, decorative boxwood combs the geisha use in their hair, folding fans, and the wagasa paper umbrellas still now a favorite in the ancient capital.

Adventurous types can also get an extremely close to home look at centuries-old living through KIE's introduction of a supplier to the geiko who also dresses up tourists like the geiko and maiko (apprentice geisha), using completely authentic cosmetics and costumes.

KIE's spring 2007 edition also contains an extensive -- and removable -- map and guide of some of the best wares available in Kyoto with geiko and maiko providing recommendations for 60 businesses that may be of interest to foreign visitors.

"These are places maiko and chaya recommend for eating. It's not just high class establishments, it's a bit of everything from Western food to Japanese food to cakes," Kudo says. "You can find places where geisha shop and geisha hang out."

From Kyoto to kabuki, where KIE tracks the Opera National de Paris performance of Ichikawa Danjuro and Ichikawa Ebizo. KIE goes behind the scenes at the Palais Garnier as the father-and-son superstars bring the common theater of the Edo-era (1603-1868) to the traditional home of entertainment for the French nobility.

Other features in the spring 2007 issue include KIE showcasing how the new head of one of Shikoku's best known Shinto shrines is taking a so far unseen approach to preserving cultural artifacts.

KIE also gets a bite of the action in the seasonal delicacy scene in Western Japan, giving readers a year-round calendar to get the tastiest treats on offer throughout the country.

Combined with the eye-grabbing galleries, whose charms this issue also feature a show of uniform-inspired fashions, KIE's spring 2007 is a feast for the senses, with its hands-on approach to tackling Kyoto and the literally mouth-watering look at some of Japan's incredible edibles. (Text by Ryann Connell, Photos courtesy of Kateigaho International Edition)

Kateigaho International Edition http://int.kateigaho.com/
March 1, 2007

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