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DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:01 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

Usually I post my pattern scans from magazines here, but since this is an entire 106 page book, it's going to get it's own page. Full book is in the Photobucket. Beside showing how to sew yukata for women, men, boys, and girls, the book has picture tutorials of how to wear yukata and how to tie various obi.

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I'm going to omit the pictures of the cute kids in yukata for now, in favor of a pattern. Here is the sizing:
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I'm going to go over the women's diagram first, but men you can follow along. Now to choose the size you want, you need a couple of your own measurements in cm. See where in the box it says ? That means 'width'. means 'length'. Okay, not so hard so far. The very first line asks for your height. No crying please. The L is for someone 5'6 (165 cm). That's okay, we can just add length to the bottom. Deep breaths, everything will be okay, my Amazonian sisters (said the almost 5'2 Tzippurah).
If you fall between 5'1 to 5'6 everything is good so far.

The second line asks for your nape to wrist length. Measure from your first palpable vertebrae to your wrist bone (or rather have a friend do it for you).

The next lines that start with are about the sleeve, so ignore it for now.

Now comes 後ろ 幅 (back width). This is half the actual width of the back, because the seam runs down the back. Double this number and add it to the next number,前 幅 (front width), also doubled to determine the size of hips the yukata is for. Here, I will do it for you: S= 101 cm (39.7 in), M= 104 cm (40.9 in), L=107 cm (~42 in). So if you have more than 107 cm hips you are going to need to add width. Following the pattern set by the instructs add 0.5 cm to the back panels for every 1 cm added to the front (remember, each step up this way is a 3 cm total increase).

Okay, you should be able to determine which size you want to make now, since most of the rest of measurements don't vary.

Men, don't think I forgot about you! The measurements for you that are important are much the same. The pattern says a S is for someone 166 cm tall (5'5), M for 174 cm (5'8.5), and L is for 180 cm (5'10.8). The front of the men's pattern doesn't vary, but the back does. Measure your widest point, either your waist or hips. S fits 110 cm (43 in), M fits 112 cm (44 in), L fits 114 cm (~45 in). You might also want to check your arm length if you are increasing the total length since that's more often a problem with tall men's garments than in women's. Read across the third row and adjust accordingly.

Now we must measure out our pieces. The arrangement below is for a Japanese width bolt. You will be able to lay things out side by side on a western bolt. General layout thoughts:
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The pattern across the bottom of the page:

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Deep breaths. It's not as complicated as it appears. We just need to apply our size choice from before to the pattern. The numbers are already written for us, the bold numbers are the M size. Written at the very bottom is the yardage required (sorry metric users, I'm going to still call it yardage, is meterage even a word?) using Japanese bolts. Here goes my cultural insensitivity, brace yourself: in America cotton comes in 45 inch (114 cm) wide bolts standard, and up to 60 inches (152 cm) in specialty fabrics. This means instead of needing 1176 cm of fabric, you can lay out a M on around 440 cm.

The book has a picture of the alternate layout (please remember a dotted line is a fold not a cut):

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Men's layout:

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Okay, almost time to make yukata! :kitti: Here is the general plan:

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Rough translation:
1. Sleeve sew
2. Migoro sew
3. Okumi baste
4. Back sew
5. (unsure of the word, pointing near collar) baste
6. Eri baste
7. Tomoeri baste (with dart?)
8. Sleeve baste on

And since it's almost 2 am here, this is where I'll leave it for tonight. The rest of the scans are in my Photobucket, although I did jump around a bit for clarity's sake. If antone wants, I can continue the tute tomorrow.

Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:03 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

I was kind of tired as I was doing all the math, so I forgot to mention a couple of things. Most Japanese sewing patterns don't include seam allowance, but this one does. The seam allowance is generally 0.5 cm, unless it's a rolled hem them the allowance is 1 cm. The allowances are generally written on the pattern.

I'm going to post the rest of the general pattern pages without explanation, since translation takes a long time for me (I don't read Japanese, I have to recognize symbol by symbol. Good news is, you don't need much Japanese to read a pattern). If you have questions, please ask. BTW, for those unfamiliar with sewing patterns that wavy S line means "not to scale" or that there is more length than shown to that piece of fabric. The little triangle thing represents pressing a seam with an iron.

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Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:04 am
by IG Team
NightwindKing

Question; on step number 4 of section 2, it looks like they're adding-in a false top-shoulder seam. Why would you do that? A normal Kimono bolt-cut fabric piece for the body would be one long strip, front and back...did they really add in a fake shoulder seam?

Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:04 am
by IG Team
Sarcasm-hime
NightwindKing wrote:Question; on step number 4 of section 2, it looks like they're adding-in a false top-shoulder seam. Why would you do that? A normal Kimono bolt-cut fabric piece for the body would be one long strip, front and back...did they really add in a fake shoulder seam?
If I'm looking at the right section, it looks to me like they're putting in the fold/seam/thing for the back waist, not the shoulder.

That said, one of my yukata does have shoulder seams, but that may be because it's a weird Chinese knockoff (possible) or to preserve the direction of the fabric pattern, since the pattern has a definite 'up'.

Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:06 am
by IG Team
Kokoro

Yes, it´s the fold on the back of the kimono.

Here´s another thread about it: Seam across the back of a kimono? (viewtopic.php?f=30&t=619)

Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:06 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

I'm putting some quick English labels on some of the pages to help out someone who is having a yukata made, so I thought I would drop the first one here. I didn't translate every term as it is kind of hard to translate some of the meanings as they are so specialized like "furi," the swinging part of the sleeve. Once again, I am a functioning illiterate, translating the block text would take me hours.

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Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:07 am
by IG Team
Emi Hana

Sorry to hijack you thread tzippurah, but the person making my Yukata found the following website for making a Yukata in English. It appears to be one of the correct ways of making a Japanese Yukata - I checked to make sure it was authentic and for the most part, it seems to follow your scans exactly.

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~weyrbrat ... index.html

The girl who found this is making my Yukata. Her name is Christy Coombs, so please give her credit for doing some research. Also, please credit the person who made this tutorial in English - Christy understands Romanji, but not Kanji. samuraixx

Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:08 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

The ISBN is 978-4834730142 and here's the Amazon link. There are a bunch of used copies, but I'm not sure if they will ship internationally. It's out of print now, I think, but it was everywhere when it first came out- I got mine at the Sanseido Bookstore in NJ. I don't see any copies on Yahoo Japan Auctions right now, but you can probably find a used copy online. Happy hunting!

Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:08 am
by IG Team
Cloverrain

Looking at the scans I have the exact same book, but maybe a newer print? :unsure:

The title changed a little to yukata wo tetsukuri, ゆかたを手作り ISBN4-8347-2427-1

Re: DIY Yukata Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:09 am
by IG Team
Tsubame

I have this book (looks an earlier issue of the same series) and the instructions are nearly identical!
no children kimonos though, and more accesories.

Yukata Pattern Scans [IMG Heavy]

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:19 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

Hi, I'm Tzippurah and I'm new here. I have sewn several yukata, obi, and hakama for cosplay in the past and I will probably sew many more in the future (I'm working up to lined kimono, right now I'm sewing a practice lined haori). This is not exactly the method I use, but it is a close approximation. I sew all my yukata by hand, so the seams will be more forgiving when I kneel, so don't be afraid to try sewing without a machine. All you really need is about 3 yards fabric (45 inches wide), a ruler, some chalk, a pair of scissors, and needle and thread.

In the May 2008 Cosmode there is a picture tutorial for making yukata and juban. A couple of good ideas (especially for cosplay) were having different detachable juban sleeves and collars. Onto the pictures:

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Re: Pattern Scans (formerly Cosmode May 2008)

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:20 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

Here are some more scans of a similar method of making yukata from a Hawaiian Japanese magazine:

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Re: Pattern Scans (formerly Cosmode May 2008)

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:22 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

Here are some yukata and jinbei patterns from Female May 2007:

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Re: Pattern Scans (formerly Cosmode May 2008)

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:22 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

A few more pictures from other issues of Female, using essentially the same patterns:

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Edit: Added pic from Female Summer 2010.

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Re: Pattern Scans (formerly Cosmode May 2008)

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:23 am
by IG Team
Tzippurah

More scans of children's jinbei patterns from Cotton Friend July 2010:

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