Painting a Kimono

Post Reply
User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:21 pm

REICHERU

Last week, I cooked up a plan to take a white uchikake, and paint it myself. :drooldrool: now I was not going to jump to a uchikake right off the get go, I was going to get a few white jubans and use them as my test subjects. because, I have noticed that many of the plain white ones often have floral patterns woven into them so my thinking was that if I just painted the pattern i could get a decent result. And once feeling brave enough Id move onto the uchikake. So have any of you tried this before? If so any pointers? I found this instructional on a website that sells supplys for this very thing.

http://www.dharmatrading.com/html/eng/m ... tions.html

So like I said Id love to hear any sugestions. and Id love even more if someone elce wants to try this too! once i gather everything I need to do it, then I will post a few pictures of results, but this is not going to happen till after January, because this might take a bit of time :]

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:22 pm

Takenoko

Not something I have tried, but having tried silk painting, there are a few things to consider first. For example, the thinner silk paints will bleed if you don't use a gutta outliner or other resist, and this can be very unpredictable along the threads on a damask weave.

Most silk painters put the silk under tension on a frame before attempting to paint it. This will be hard to do with a whole uchikake.

Painting it whole, it will also be rather difficult

- to avoid paint leaching through to the lining

- to set the paint to make it permanent - all the silk paints I've used before need setting with heat and/or steam, which might be hard to do with the uchikake whole. They do, after all, weigh very heavy, even the ones without hefty amounts of machine embroider. The bulk would be a problem for steaming!

I have one silk rinzu damask bolt set aside for painting, but doubt I'll have a chance to get that one done soon. I am planning to tackle it by mocking up a karinui (tacked kimono), marking where I want my patterns/colour changes, then adding gutta outlines. But I am half decided to just go for a bokashi shaded effect anyway. Like many things, simple might be best!

Kugepoet has done a lot of work with stencilling etc. on silk - have a look at her posts re this - and there are several topics about painting kimono, though maybe not uchikake, that you might find helpful. :)

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:22 pm

kugepoet

As you know, kimono silks are usually decorated on the bolt, not after assembly.

For all the painted garments I've done, I've cut out the silk first. If lay-out of the design required things to line up, I'd sew up the back seam, but that's it. Then I'd lay the fabric out and paint. You can see details at http://www.wodefordhall.com/fakingit.htm

I use fabric paints, not the silk dye paints that require gutta resists, because I'm usually working on silk that's already been dyed and I'm trying to make the paint look like brocade or embroidery, not yuzen.

I suggest you start by painting some scarves. Practice. A lot. Look at how the color behaves when you apply it to the silk. Does it run? Do you get consistent coverage or is it streaky?

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:23 pm

Kokoro

One thing about making the paint permanent:
Someone told me once that there are silk dyes that get fixed by having air contact for several days. You use them when paniting objects which could not be steamed or ironed easily (like a silk umbrella for example).

I never tried this but maybe one of the others has experiences with this :)

And how about shrinkage when trying to dye the whole kimono/uchikake?
I could imagine that the seams could get wrinkled by this....
:???:

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:23 pm

REICHERU

im not gonna dye it all at once im gonna paint the whole thing by hand with a brush!! :katana: Im gonna be on bed rest for awhile after surgery, and i need a project!


this might sound a little weird, but ive painted my hijabs some of them are silk with my husbands vegtable based gel food colors (hes a pastry chef and has tons laying around) anyways I thought about using that because they didnt bleed and the color set almost right away. so i was thinking about using them, and I use my round fabric stretcher to hold it tight. but like i said im gonna test it on a cheap juban first till i get it down,

I have never used dye, made just for silk. does it run easy? if so im just gonna use the gel food coloring  :]

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:23 pm

SONGBIRD516

Hmm...silk dyes usually need to be set with heat because otherwise the color will fade with time. That would be my concern with a vegetable-based dye. The best silk dyes actually react with the silk protein to fix the color.

If you can't heat it, which you really won't be able to do with a thick uchikake (heat also may shrink it...) your choices are a bit limited. You'll probably have to use a silk paint which is fairly thick. This will make it look more like an oil painting on canvas, and you may have seen that look before on obi. As was already mentioned, though, not getting any paint on the lining will be really really hard..

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:24 pm

yumehime

I don't know if this helps, but I was once told that a kimono was put together with loose hand stiches to make it easy to take it appart so the indavidual pieces could be washed and dryed flat before it was put back together. I got this info from a historian, and it kinda maked sense because it would mean that you would not need to iorn it after washing, just tack the parts back together, protecting delicat thread work and more fragile and expensive fabrics. Perhaps you want to use the same concept when you paint, drawing your outlines when it's whole and painting each piece after taking it appart.

Please let me now about your experience, as I wanted to try this too, but all my kimonos are made of random fabric my mom gave me, so I don't know if any will take dye. She did however give me silk recently, so I plan to save the scraps for testing and painting that one. Sadly, it is already dyed, but I may be able to make it work.

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:24 pm

buyoka

My sewing teacher said we were sewing kimono by hand rather than by machine, because there was more give in the stitches for floorsitting. It's basically a basting type of stitch and easy to pull out. I think the sewing goes in particular directions so you know where the knot should be, grab it and pulll it out.

As far as I know, someone who is going to apply designs would put the kimono pieces together with really big basting stitches, draw the design, then take the pieces apart to do the actual work.

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:25 pm

hibana

buyoka wrote:
My sewing teacher said we were sewing kimono by hand rather than by machine, because there was more give in the stitches for floorsitting.

Yes, if you sew the seams by machine or backstitch, the fabric will rip under tension. With a hand-sewn running stitch (especially the _.._.._.._ variety used in Japanese sewing) the thread can slide along the seam without damaging it.

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:25 pm

kathiego

Hibana-san, What if you used a longer stitch or if you could find a machine stitch similar to the one you illustrated like a stretch stitch? Would that help so that stitches wouldn't rip out if done by machine? :)

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:25 pm

hibana

Kathiego-san, I'm sure it would help a little, but machines seams are usually sewn with lockstitch, where the top and bottom threads are twisted around each other. It doesn't allow the thread to be drawn smoothly through the fabric once the seam is completed. With a running stitch, there is only one thread, and it's not anchored to anything along the length of the seam, so it can slide through, allowing the fabric to bunch up rather than tearing. Did that make sense?

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:26 pm

buyoka

I think that Japanese sewing machine called Janome was originally made for sewing yukata. I thought I heard about it several years ago, but then when I go on their website to check, I get confused -- there are so many models.

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:27 pm

kathiego

Hibana-san, I understand what you're saying. Still and all I hope it will work out for me anyways. I'm afraid I just don't have the patience to sit for long periods of time and sew a whole hikizuri by hand. Maybe this is a flaw in me or on my part. :(

Oh wow buyoka-san! I've never heard that! I have the Janome Memory Craft 10001.

http://www.janome.com/index.cfm/Machine ... s_Overview

I have Generations as my digitizing software for the embroidery designs. :)

http://www.generationsemb.com/site_cont ... 20nav.html

The generations website doesn't really have a good like home page explaining about digitizing or the process of. They mainly have a page that explains a tiny bit and then you can download the product and/or buy it. It is a very helpful program for digitizing embroidery designs. What I've done is digitized a number of Japanese cranes, a small fan, some small blue and white noshi and other Japanese related designs which I will try to have the sewing machine embroider on my hikizuri, once I get it made. :)

If you don't know what digitizing is, it's like making a design into stitches, using the computer, that you can transfer onto the sewing machine so that the sewing machine can understand it and so that the design you like ends up getting stitched out in the machine embroidery. It takes a long time to do sometimes. :)

User avatar
IG Team
Administration Team
Administration Team
Posts: 3290
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: Painting a Kimono

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:28 pm

misio

I saw a video on Youtube of a costumemaker painting a kimono for opera. I thought it was relevant so here is the linkŁ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4vcVfx8MP0

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest