Oiran and Tayu's walk

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Oiran and Tayu's walk

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 29, 2016 8:06 pm

Nekorine:

There might be a thread for this, but I couldn't find it!

I just want to confirm this. Does both Oiran and Tayu walk differently? Tayu keep the bottom of the geta on the ground as they glide into an arch shape, while a Oiran have the side of the geta glide on the ground in a semi circle shape?
I saw the Tayu documentary and the movie Sakuran which is based on Yoshiwara Oiran.

Just want to know.... a little confused :mad:

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Re: Oiran and Tayu's walk

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 29, 2016 8:06 pm

Keiha:

Essentially, every woman has her variation on the walk, whether it's in timing or a little extra kick of the foot, or whatever, just like any woman in heels or day-to-day life. Cecilia Segawa Seigle explains it in this book that it was first started by a courtesan as a way to stand out and show off, and it was quickly emulated until it became the standard. At the back of that same book are a few charts outlining a couple of variations on the dōchū.

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Re: Oiran and Tayu's walk

Post by IG Team » Wed Jun 29, 2016 8:07 pm

Issendai:

Also, modern tayuu are part of a continuous tradition, while modern oiran are actresses who are more likely to play to popular conceptions of oiran. Sakuran is an interesting mix of the authentic and the heavily Hollywoodized--some of the details are amazingly well researched, some are accurate for the Meiji period but aren't a reflection of the previous 250 years of courtesan culture*, and some are pure fantasy. For example, the way the oirans' kimono are pulled low in the back--modern viewers are used to seeing geisha with low collars, so seeing a sexy character wearing a high collar looks wrong. However, photos of real oiran show that their collars were always fairly close to their necks. Modern Japanese viewers have set ideas about oiran promenades that the moviemakers had to play to, so I wouldn't use the movie as a resource for information about real oiran.


* The Meiji period was the nadir of courtesan culture. Ask and I'll rant for you.

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